Leadership Centre

Supporting leadership capacity building within Ontario.

Leadership Centre website

Enhancing leadership competencies, facilitating thoughtful discussion and examination of leadership issues for public health professionals.

Visit site

Community Food Advisor

Promoting safe and nutritious food selection, preparation and storage practices.

Community Food Advisor website

Community Food Advisors work in their community to improve and promote safe and healthy food selection, preparation, and storage practices.

Visit site

Public Health and You

Your questions about public health answered...all in one place.

Public Health and You website

Learn about why public health plays a vital role in ensuring the health of communities across Ontario!

Visit site

Ontario Public Health Association

Committed to improving the health of Ontarians.

OPHA website

Since 1949, OPHA has served as a catalyst for development in the Public Health sector.

Visit site

Nutrition Resource Centre

Credible public health nutrition at your fingertips.

Nutrition Resource Centre website

Strengthening the capacity of health professionals across all care settings and in all communities across Ontario.

Visit site
Contact Us

The OPHA is a not‐for‐profit member‐based association that provides leadership in advancing public health in Ontario. Our Association represents six public and community health disciplines and our membership represents many public health and community health professionals from Ontario. To learn more about us, our structure, strategic direction, or membership, please visit the following links:

The OPHA provides leadership on issues affecting the public's health and works to strengthen the impact of people who are active in public and community health throughout Ontario. For more information, please visit the following pages:

The OPHA creates and maintains advocacy initiatives with a province-wide perspective. For more information, please visit the following pages:

This section includes the latest news about the OPHA and its programs, upcoming OPHA events, and other news of interest to the public health sector. For more information, please visit the following pages:

The OPHA leads the development of expertise in public and community health through collaboration, consultation and partnerships. Learn more about our Constituent Societies here.

The OPHA leads the development of expertise in public and community health through collaboration, consultation and partnerships. Learn more about our Constituent Societies here.

The OPHA Member’s Lounge is a dedicated space reserved for our OPHA members to store and access important information and exclusive resources. The Lounge includes the following:

Two new resources highlight impact of alcohol and solutions for change


Two new resources highlight impact of alcohol and solutions for change

Two new resources highlight impact of alcohol and solutions for change
November 15, 2017
This week, November 12-17, 2017, is National Addictions Awareness Week (NAAW); NAAW is a week that highlights the issues associated with alcohol and substance misuse and the solutions to help address them. Two new documents that provide an opportunity for Canadians to gain awareness about the impacts of alcohol misuse and how to bring forward solutions for change are: a) the American Society of Clinical Oncology’s (ASCO) statement highlighting the link between alcohol consumption and cancer risk1 and, b) the release of the Canadian Centre for Substance Use and Addiction’s (CCSA) status report, The National Alcohol Strategy Monitoring Project.2

ASCO’s statement draws much needed attention to the link between alcohol and cancer. The carcinogenic effects apply to all classifications of alcohol: beer, wine and spirits. The Canadian Cancer Society cautions that alcohol increases the risk of developing cancer of the breast, colon and rectum, esophagus, larynx, liver, mouth and pharynx.3 While even modest use of alcohol can increase cancer risk, the relationship between alcohol and cancer is generally dose dependent: the more you drink, the higher your risk is. However, it’s not only the amount you drink but the amount you drink regularly that increases cancer risk. For example, drinking 3.5 drinks a day can double or triple the risk of developing cancer of the mouth, pharynx, larynx and esophagus, and can increase the risk of colon, rectum and breast cancer by 1.5 times.3 In 2012, 5.5% of all new cancers and 5.8% of all cancer deaths globally were believed to be attributable to alcohol.1  While the link between alcohol and cancer has previously been established, the endorsement of ASCO as a professional body reinforces the necessity of working towards a culture of moderation.  As public health professionals we can leverage this endorsement to help raise awareness and educate physicians and the public of the many harms associated with alcohol consumption.

The CCSA status report provides a framework through which the National Alcohol Strategy can be accomplished, highlighting four strategic areas: health promotion, prevention and education; health services; availability of alcohol and; safe communities.  This status report provides findings about progress that has been made towards the implementation of strategy recommendations and draws attention to informational gaps and variations in policy throughout Canadian jurisdictions that need to be addressed to achieve a coordinated and effective approach.  This document provides resources to work towards such a vision and highlights indicators for monitoring progress.2 

Both the ASCO statement and the CCSA status report urge us to work towards a culture of moderation and provide strategies or frameworks for how this can be done. Let’s start by raising awareness.
 
References
1. LoConte NK., Brewster AM., Kaur JS.,  Merrill JK., Alberg AJ., (2017). Alcohol and Cancer: a Statement of the American Society of Clinical Oncology. Journal of Clinical Oncology, 35. Retrieved 11/14/2017 from: http://ascopubs.org/doi/full/10.1200/JCO.2017.76.1155.
2 Canadian Centre on Substance Use and Addiction. (2017). The National Alcohol Strategy monitoring project: a status report. Ottawa, Ont.: Author.
3. Canadian Cancer Society. (2017). Alcohol. Retrieved 11/14/2017 from: http://www.cancer.ca/en/prevention-and-screening/live-well/alcohol/?region=on
 

Upcoming events

2-day Mental Health First Aid Workshop
Prenatal Class (Young Parents Series)